Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

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Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 7:59

Jon Ludvig Hammer est presque tombé dans les bras de Magnus Carlsen. Ces deux joueurs et amis d'enfance ne s'étaient pas vus depuis trois semaines avant de se retrouver au sixième étage du Hyatt l'hôtel à Chennai dimanche matin. Jusqu'à présent, on ne connaissait personne d'autre que Jon Ludvig Hammer comme secondant de Magnus Carlsen, mais NRK.no peut aujourd'hui affirmer que Jon Ludvig Hammer a été le seul secondant de Magnus ! A 10.000 km de distance, uniquement par Skype et par emails. Pour le grand-maître Leif Erlend Johannessen c'est étonnant : « Ne pas avoir ses secondants près de lui pour le match le plus important de sa vie... c'est unique, du moins dans les 50 dernières années. » Avant d'ajouter : « Même le loup solitaire Bobby Fischer avait ses secondants américains avec lui quand il a joué le match de 1972. »

Carlsen a un grand sourire quand il parle des efforts de son ami d'enfance. « Jon Ludvig a fait un excellent travail. Il a complètement bloqué Anand avec les Blancs, et il a gagné le match pour moi. Je suis très heureux. » Le nouveau champion du monde a dit aussi : « Je me sentais un peu mal à chaque fois que je recevais les fichiers avec ses préparations à sept heures du matin en Norvège. Je savais alors qu'il avait travaillé toute la nuit, et j'avais mauvaise conscience si je n'utilisais pas la préparation. »

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 8:01


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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 8:08

Vidéos sympathiques cheers 

www.nrk.no

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 8:11

Merci Susan Polgar

Photos de ce Championnat

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 8:24

Defeated, drained but Viswanathan Anand plans next moves

For those of us in Team Vishy, it was difficult to find words of comfort the morning after Magnus Carlsen won the World Chess Championship. All of us — his wife Aruna, son Akhil and the team of seconds and managers — met one last time for breakfast in the presidential suite of the Hyatt Regency.

While having pancakes, fruit and cheese, Anand briefly analysed the match. Although jokes were being cracked, at some point, there was unexpected silence. You could hear a pin drop. Everybody was recovering from the big blow. What went wrong? It will take a while to find the right answers.

Anand says that he needs some time to collect his thoughts.

“I will play the London Chess Classic Tournament in two weeks. After that, I will take a long break and spend quality time with my family. I will play in Zurich in February and then we will see if I am ready to play the Candidates Tournament in March 2014,” a drained out Anand told us.

His seconds too are tired, their faces pale. They have worked for hours, for days and for weeks on end, staying up until the wee hours, preparing opening lines. They could only take short walks now and then when Anand was playing the games. “It is a strange feeling, because there is no game today and we do not need to prepare anything,” says Radek Wojtaszek, the Grandmaster from Poland, who has worked with Anand on four World Championship matches.

Grandmaster Peter Leko of Hungary, who has played a World Championship match against Kramnik in 2004 himself, knows exactly how it feels to lose an important match. “A World Championship match sucks all the energy out of you”, says Leko.

Anand may have lost but he has some happy memories about this World Championship.

“I was very touched to see parents who brought their children to the venue to see the games. They bought tickets for their kids and they sat in the front row. It reminded of the times in which I was a kid and my mother used to take me to tournaments,” he says.

The reactions of the crowd deeply moved Anand.

“In Game 2, I opened with 1.e4 and everybody was clapping, because they expected to see an exciting game. In Game 9, the same thing happened, but I was playing 1.d4 in that game. Since 1.e4 did not really bring me good luck in the earlier games, I decided to play a different move. The audience started clapping again, because they knew that I needed to win that game.”

This is something that Anand had not witnessed all through his long career.

“I only knew stories from Russia or other Eastern European countries, in which people clapped, when one of the players made a good move. It shows that the audience had a very good sense for the game, my state of mind and the overall match situation,” he says.

Anand feels that his fans may have been disappointed about the outcome of the match but he assures them he isn’t about to quit.

“I will not give up chess. The people here have been very supportive here,” he says. Soon, he is chasing Akhil around the breakfast tables bringing smiles back on the glum faces in the presidential suite. Don’t worry India, Anand will be back!

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Indulgent le 25.11.13 8:50

Magnifique travail Alain !

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ROBERT Gérard

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 8:53

Merci Gérard Wink 

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 8:55


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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 9:39

Exclusive pic of Magnus & his 22 karat gold medal Smile That's a million dollar smile ! Susan Polgar



Twitter Susan Polgar

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 9:39

La fierté du papa au second plan smiley41.abgif.gif 

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 13:03


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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 13:05

Je veux la même coupe !!!!



Encore des photos : Photos Susan

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 13:07

Waouhhhhhhhhhhhhhh !!!



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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Lion_aile le 25.11.13 16:04

Indulgent a écrit:Magnifique travail Alain !
Oui pas mieux dit
Merci Alain

_________________
" Plus j'apprends plus je m'aperçois que je ne sais pas " (Galilée)
"La menace est plus forte que son exécution" (Aaron Nimzovitch)
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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Lion_aile le 25.11.13 16:04

Le Fou du Roi a écrit:La fierté du papa au second plan smiley41.abgif.gif 
+1

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" Plus j'apprends plus je m'aperçois que je ne sais pas " (Galilée)
"La menace est plus forte que son exécution" (Aaron Nimzovitch)
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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 17:16

Mon fils a 3 ans, faut que je le coache !!!!! pirat 

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 19:32


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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 19:36

Harry Potter of chess wins world title
(Sunday, November 24, 2013)

CHENNAI: Norwegian prodigy Magnus Carlsen claimed the world chess title on Friday night in emphatic style, dethroning India’s Viswanathan Anand after a one-sided series and becoming the first Western champion since 1975.

The 22-year-old, the current world number one, won three games and forced a seventh draw on Friday to achieve the victory mark of 6.5 points in Anand’s home city of Chennai.

Admitting to some early nerves which settled after the fourth game, Carlsen told reporters he had sensed vulnerability in his far more experienced opponent and had forced a series of errors.

“Vish has been the world champion for so long, he’s one of the greatest of all time. I’m of course very, very happy to have got the better of him,” Carlsen told a post-match press conference.

“I am really honoured and happy to have won it,” he added.

Anand, who at 43 is 21 years older than his rival, lost the title he has held since 2007 despite a last-gasp fight in an attritional 130-move game on Friday that lasted four hours and 45 minutes. With Carlsen having sealed the championship, the last two contests in the 12-game match scheduled on Sunday and Monday have been cancelled.

Both players signed the chess board before heading to a joint press conference where Anand admitted he had “blundered” again in the final game and said sorry to his fans.

“As for the match in general it’s clear that he dominated. At the start of the match I thought my chances depended on my ability to last long games without making a lot of mistakes,” said Anand.

Carlsen will win 60 percent of the total prize fund of $2.24 million, while Anand takes home the rest.

Carlsen, hailed by Russian legend Garry Kasparov as a Harry Potter-type “super-talent” and considered the pre-match favourite, was in supreme form during the fortnight’s contest.

“Congratulations to Magnus for his victory! He continues to shatter the highest expectations with his skill and tenacity. Three cheers!” Kasparov wrote on Twitter after the match.

Carlsen missed by a few weeks becoming the youngest world champion, a record set by his one-time coach Kasparov in 1985.

The last Westerner to hold the world champion title was American legend Bobby Fischer who relinquished it in 1975.

Woman grandmaster Susan Polgar told AFP that Carlsen’s approach had been “refreshingly new” and aggressive, which had bamboozled his far more experienced opponent.

“In the first eight games of this championship match, he forced his game plan onto Anand,” Polgar said.

“In chess, positioning and strategy is crucial and unless the development of one’s pieces is going according to one’s plan, experience will count for little,” she added.

Carlsen has dominated the World Chess Federation’s list of top players in the last three years, with a top rating of 2,870 points that broke Kasparov’s best of 2,851 points achieved in 1999.

Introduced to chess by his father, Carlsen showed off his genius as a toddler.

At the age of two, the self-taught prodigy knew by heart all the major car brands and later memorised the long list of Norway’s municipalities, with their flags and administrative centres.

The breakthrough came in 2004 when the 13-year-old defeated Russian former world champion Anatoly Karpov.

A fashion model in his spare time, Carlsen made it to the Time magazine list of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2013. He also won the Chess Oscars, awarded by Russian chess magazine ‘64’ to the world’s best player, for four consecutive years from 2009 to 2012.

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 20:06



Source : photo d'Anastasiya Karlovich

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 25.11.13 22:24

«Zurich Chess Challenge 2014» with Viswanathan Anand and Magnus Carlsen

The «Zurich Chess Challenge 2014» will be the first encounter between the newly crowned World Champion, Norway’s Magnus Carlsen, and the former title holder, India’s Viswanathan Anand after their recent match in Chennai. From Wednesday, 29 January to Tuesday, 4 February 2014, they will compete in the 3rd Zurich Chess Challenge along with four other great chess stars Levon Aronian (Arm), Hikaru Nakamura (USA), Fabiano Caruana (It) and Boris Gelfand (Isr). With an average of 2794 Elo points (according to the September 13 rating list) this is going to be the strongest tournament in chess history.
The main sponsor is Oleg Skvortsov of the «International Gemological Laboratories», Moscow, with the Zurich Chess Club acting as organizer.
The owner of «IGC International Gemological Laboratories», Mr. Oleg Skvortsov, is the creator of this chess event. He not only loves chess, but also plays chess and supports chess events. Furthermore, Mr. Skvortsov knows many of the greatest chess players in the world personally and has played a lot of games with them.
The first Zurich Chess Challenge in 2012 was a match between Kramnik and Aronian. The second event in 2013 was a double-round robin with Kramnik, Anand, Caruana and Gelfand.
For the 2014 edition, a blitz tournament will determine the color distribution. A round-robin tournament of five rounds with a classical time control is then followed by a rapid tournament with colors reversed on the last day of play. A won game in the classical tournament counts 2 points, a draw 1 point. Wins in the rapid tournament count 1 point and draws half a point.

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 26.11.13 8:03

Interview interessante de Magnus...

Carlsen: Now it’s probably my turn to teach him

I don’t think Anand is favourite to become the challenger: Magnus Carlsen
New world chess champion Magnus Carlsen says he is now ‘the man to beat’
Arundhati Ramanathan

Chennai: He became the world chess champion only three days ago, but Magnus Carlsen already has his eyes on defending the title next year.

The 22-year-old Norwegian wouldn’t reveal the identity of the players he trained with for his just-concluded match against Viswanathan Anand because the same team is likely going to assist him next year. Knowing who they are could help his opponent second-guess the way he would prepare.

For Anand, the world champion for six years till he lost the crown on Friday, it’s been a “heavy blow” as he himself put it, and it is not clear immediately whether he will ever play in the world championship again.

“He is very disappointed… He made mistakes (in this match) that he never used to make earlier,” said Eric van Reem, one of Anand’s managers.

Asked if he would play in the so-called candidates tournament, which will determine the challenger to Carlsen’s title, Reem said Anand, 43, hadn’t decided on it. Age is running out on him, and the difficulty will only increase with time. “He has played five (world) championships in the last six years and that drains a lot of energy,” Reem added.

Shortly after he received a 3.5kg gold-plated silver trophy, a gold medal and cash prize of Rs.9.9 crore from Tamil Nadu chief minister J. Jayalalithaa, Carlsen agreed to be interviewed by a small group of Indian journalists. Without mincing words, he said he is now “the man to beat”, and he didn’t consider Anand as the likely challenger to his title, looking at his recent performance. Edited excerpts:

Coming into the finals, did the close shave you had at the candidates’ tournament at all bother you?

I stopped thinking about it. Obviously the candidates’ tournament was a close call. It was very tiring and very exciting as well. But when I reached the final, I put everything behind and focused on what was happening in the final and not on how I got to it.

What did you have in mind when you were preparing for this match?

My main objective was to get playable positions—not to come under any great pressure from the beginning. I think I managed to equalize games from the opening, especially with black pieces, and outplay Anand, or at least pressure him in the rest of the games.

Did the match turn out to be easier than you had expected?

The match was difficult in the beginning because, for instance, in the first game, Vishy came up with a novelty in a really obscure line of play. When I analysed the game later, I was very impressed with the things that he had considered and how fast he was thinking. I was thinking to myself, if he was going to play this way, how am I going to ever catch him off-guard. But fortunately, it turned out that he, too, was a bit nervous.

Besides your preparation, what helped you clinch the title?

It helped me to stay relaxed during the match and treat it like any other tournament. I did what I usually do. To stay relaxed, I like to take part in other sports, watch movies in between games, and not think about the result all the time.

Does becoming the world champion make you anxious?

Not really. I’ve been the No. 1 (by rating) for some time, but it has always been a bit of burden on me that I did not have the world title. Now that I have it, I can relax a little bit and do what I do best.

Do you plan to go back to university?

For now, I am happy playing chess.

You have named some players as potential challengers to your world title, but not Anand. What are your thoughts about his future as a chess player?

First of all, he’ll have to figure out if he wants to play in the candidates’ tournament. His results lately have not been too good. He’ll need some time to readjust. If he is able to play at his highest level, I think he can come back, but right now I don’t think he is the favourite to become the challenger.

So do you think Anand’s era of chess is over?

I think it all depends on his motivation. He’ll have to figure a lot of things out. If he manages to keep his motivation after this match, he’ll be a force to reckon with.

Why have you refused to name your seconds even after winning the world title?

I am already thinking about defending the title and that is the reason why I don’t want to talk about my seconds too much, because they would be part of my team going forward.

Chess appears to have got a huge fillip in Norway.

What we’ve seen in Norway is (that) an amazing number of people who did not play chess previously are now following chess—playing the game in schools and at work, and discussing it all the time.

Who do you owe this title to?

I think I owe it to everyone: my seconds (players who assisted), my team, my family, and especially my father. My team has attended to every need and every request however unreasonable it might have been.

Is there anything at all that you have learnt from this match or Anand?

To be honest, I think I’ve learnt a great deal from him in the past, both by playing against him and training with him. Previously, he could outplay me in certain positions, and he could do that in ways that no else could. But I think I showed him in a way that although he has taught me many things in the past, now it’s probably my turn to teach him.

Source : http://www.livemint.com

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 26.11.13 8:09

I will be the man to beat, warns Carlsen
By Venkata Krishna B | ENS - CHENNAI
Published: 26th November 2013 12:44 AM
Last Updated: 26th November 2013 02:19 AM

It was not his tactics or gameplan that helped Magnus Carlsen become the new king of chess. It was the long walks at Semmozhi Park, spending quality time with his family at Fisherman’s Cove, kicking up dust while playing football and basketball at Santhome School – all part of his relaxing strategy that brought him laurels.

Speaking to the media on Monday after the closing ceremony which saw him officially crowned as new world champion, Carlsen said he had to calm his nerves after the first two rounds to strangle five-time world champion Viswanathan Anand, who was under pressure.

“At the start I was nervous because of the pressure of playing in the World Chess Championship. But after that I calmed down and treated it like just another tournament and did what I do usually to relax – to do some sports and movies in between. I also made it a point not to be tensed and think about the results and focused on what was there in front,” he said. [Watch video]

Carlsen, who is ranked number one in the world, said the title has reduced the burden of expectations and he will look to consolidate his position at the top for long, “I’ve been ranked number one for sometime and it was always a little burden that I didn’t win the World Championship and now that I have that, I can relax a bit and play the way I’ve been playing so far. I have a quite a lead with the world No 1 tag and the World Championship, so I will be the man to beat for sometime,” he said with confidence.

The Norwegian credited his family, especially his father, for his success and added he is already looking forward to the next World Championship, which will be held in November 2014. “One of the reasons why I have not revealed my seconds, who did a remarkable job during the course of the match, is they will be involved in my preparation for the title defense next year and I don’t want to hamper my preparations,” he said.

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 26.11.13 8:12


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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 26.11.13 9:45

'Super talent' Magnus Carlsen: the new world chess champion

Oslo:  As a prodigal genius and fashion model, newly-crowned world chess champion Magnus Carlsen has already lit up the game and has now added the world crown to his list of achievements.

The Norwegian world number one earned his maiden world title on Friday when he defeated reigning champion Viswanathan Anand of India in the 12-game challenge match in Chennai.

Carlsen, who turns 23 on November 30, missed out on becoming the youngest world champion by a few weeks, a record set by his one-time coach and Russian legend Garry Kasparov in 1985.

Kasparov, the undisputed world champion from 1985 to 1993, described Carlsen as a Harry Potter-type "super-talent" who is the first Westerner to hold the world title since America's Bobby Fischer in 1975.

"Magnus rocketed to the top of the rating list almost without pause, displaying a consistency and tenacity rare in a young player to accompany his limitless talent," Kasparov wrote in the Business Insider earlier this month.

Carlsen has dominated the World Chess Federation's list of top players in the last three years, with a top rating of 2,870 points that broke Kasparov's best of 2,851 points achieved in 1999.

"Magnus is a very different player and his approach is refreshingly new," American chess grandmaster and former Olympic champion Susan Polgar told AFP, with his aggressive tactics on show throughout the bouts with Anand.

Introduced to chess by his father, Carlsen showed off his genius as a toddler.

At the age of two, the self-taught prodigy knew by heart all the car brands and later memorised the long list of all Norway's municipalities, with their flags and administrative centres.

Sibling rivalry with one of his older sisters sparked his interest in chess, which soon led to his first competition at the age of eight.

The breakthrough came in 2004, when the 13-year-old defeated Russian former world champion Anatoly Karpov, forced Kasparov to a draw and became a grandmaster.

The dishevelled and serious looking teenager was once described by the Washington Post as the "Mozart of chess".

A fashion model in his spare time, Carlsen made it to the Time magazine list of the 100 most influential people in the world in 2013.

He also won the Chess Oscars, awarded by Russian chess magazine '64' to the world's best player, for four consecutive years from 2009 to 2012.

Carlsen admits two weaknesses: not being a good winner or a good loser.

"You cannot be a number one in the world and be a good loser," he told reporters in Oslo last month. "I'm not a good winner either. I try not to rub it in to my opponents. Unless they deserve it, of course."

Worried he may fall sick in India during the title bout, Carlsen and his team visited Chennai in August to check out the facilities in the southern coastal city.

By the end of the three-day visit, Carlsen's team had forced organisers to insert an "illness" clause in the contract by which a player can take a two-day break if he fell sick.

All-India Chess Federation secretary V. Hariharan said it was the first time an illness clause had been included for a world championship match.

Despite his overwhelming dominance over the last few years, Carlsen warned rivals his best was yet to come.

"I still have so many ways to improve," he said. "In every tournament, in almost every game, I find that I make mistakes.

"I definitely have some kind of talent but I don't know exactly what it consists of."

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Re: Retour sur le Championnat du Monde d'Echecs FIDE à Chennai

Message par Invité le 26.11.13 14:28

Feuille de match signée par Magnus Carlsen !!!!!



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